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He is Alive!

He is Alive!

 

Mary wrapped barley bread, dried olives, dates, and figs in a cloth and placed them in her husband’s pouch.  Cleopas extended his arms, allowing his wife to tighten his girdle with a clasp then tuck coins in one side of it and on the other side a small serving of figs and nuts.  When Cleopas lowered his arms, Mary beckoned him to raise his left again so she could slip a water-filled goatskin up his arm and over his shoulder.  Mary tugged at the sword fastened to his girdle.  Satisfied that it was tightly in place, she took a step back and looked him over.  Her sad penetrating eyes grew with concern.

“I wish you would stay with us,” Mary whispered.  “There is danger.”

Cleopas kissed his wife on the forehead then held her tight.  “I will return before nightfall tomorrow.  Do not worry.”

Mary gazed over her shoulder at the disciples.  “Everyone is so worried what the Romans will do next.  I am afraid for you.”

“Meydad is with me and we will protect one another if anything goes wrong.  There is no need for concern.  If Ha’Adon is willing, I will return.”

“Be safe,” Mary said.

“Meydad, come.  We must go.”

Cleopas took one last look at the disciples, each one standing or sitting in various areas of the room, their faces perplexed from the stories they had been told by the women, and Peter.  Earlier this morning they discovered Yeshua’s tomb was empty.  Peter fled the house with John (whom Yeshua loved), Cleopas and several other disciples at Peter’s heels, all rushing to the tomb.  It was as the women had said.  The tomb was empty.  Yeshua was gone.  Distraught and weakened by what he had seen, Cleopas returned to the house, wondering what all of this meant.

The disciple hugged his wife again then he and Meydad set out for Emmaus on foot.  They took time to labor through memories of the last three days, how they had gone from joy to that of sadness.  Cleopas couldn’t believe that one day he had witnessed Yeshua riding into the city on a donkey, everyone rejoicing and praising the Messiah.  Then the next day, Yeshua was carrying his cross on that long walk to Golgotha.

Cleopas couldn’t reconcile the live Messiah with the dead Messiah who had succumbed to a torturous beating and crucifixion.  To complicate matters, the women and Peter claimed to have seen him.  Cleopas didn’t know what to make of this.

I am the resurrection and the life . . .

Those words burned in his soul even now, but he no more understood them today than he did yesterday.

“What are you thinking, Cleopas?  You have not said a word since we left Jerusalem,” Meydad said.

“I am searching for understanding.”

“I am too.  Do you still believe Yeshua was the Messiah?”

“I do, but there is so much that does not make sense to me.”

“Now that he is dead, the answers may have been buried with him,” Meydad said.

“I do not get it, Meydad.  One day he is preaching ‘I am the way,’ and the next day he is gone.  And we do not even have a body to prove he died.  I know he died.  I saw him.  Bloody linen in the tomb attests to the fact that he was there.”

“You think the Romans took him?”

“Perhaps.  No!  I do not know.  But if the women and Peter saw him, then where is he?”  A long silence wedged between Cleopas and Meydad as the two men pondered the question.  “You should have seen him in the temple, Meydad.  There has never been anything like it.  He sat among our people teaching with authority.  He spoke of love and unity . . . of G-d the Father.  He spoke of a new heaven . . . a new earth.  His words brought peace and hope.”

“That may be, but we are still under Roman rule,” Meydad said, stating the obvious.  “There is no new heaven or earth here.  He failed to rescue us from the hands of these butchers.  All he may have done was make things worse for us.  Our people are nervous . . . scared.  They have no idea what will happen next.  It seems to me that we are far worse than we were at the beginning.”

“I do not believe it,” Cleopas said, trying his best to hold on to hope.

“You mean you will not believe it.”

“Here is what I know, Meydad.  Yeshua was crucified for a debt he did not owe.  He died in place of Barabbas.  It is Barabbas who should have died on that cross.  Not Yeshua.”

“Why do you think Yeshua let it happen?”

“Meydad, what makes you think he allowed it?”

“For one thing, he never defended himself.  Is that not odd?”

“That is so troubling to me.”

“For another thing, the miracles he performed are widely known.  Are you forgetting about Lazarus, how he raised him from the dead?”

“How could anyone forget Lazarus’s resurrection?”

“Then why Yeshua did not prevent his own death?  Did he not have the power?”

“Of course he did.  He fed five thousand people with three fish and two loaves of bread, Meydad!  He made the blind see and he healed the sick.  Of course he had power.”  Cleopas stopped for a moment and dragged his hand on his face.  “That is the very part of all this that I cannot comprehend.  He did not need to suffer.”  Cleopas walked ahead, his feet pounding the dusty road in anger.  “There he was standing in the midst of all Roman and Jewish authority at a perfect time to destroy them and declare his kingdom.  He had the power to end all Roman rule with a mere word from his mouth, but he did not do it.  He never said a mumbling word.  Why?  Why?”  Cleopas was clearly frustrated.

“Maybe it was just his time to go,” Meydad concluded.

“But there is so much more work to be done,” Cleopas said.  He wasn’t quite sure who he was trying to convince, Meydad or himself.

“Do you believe the women?  Do you believe Peter?  You think he is alive?”

“If so, where is he?”

“What is it that you are discussing?” a traveler asked as he joined in their walk.

Cleopas and Meydad stood still and looked at the traveler with dismay.  The traveler had sandals on his feet, a scarf loosely covering his head and draped around his neck.  But he had no provisions—no food and no water.

“Are you the only one in all of Jerusalem who has not heard what has happened there?” Cleopas asked, his emotions on the brink of collapse.

“What things?” the traveler asked.

“The things about Yeshua of Nazareth, a prophet mighty in deed and word in the sight of G-d and all his people . . . how our chief priests and rulers ridiculed him, falsely accused him, then delivered him to Pilate to be crucified.  We were hoping he was the one who would redeem Israel.  But now he is dead.  He has been gone away from us for three days.  Our hearts ache for him.”  Cleopas choked up, tears welled in his eyes.

“Then something strange happened this morning,” Cleopas continued.  “Our women went to his tomb with spices to prepare for his burial, but they came back to the house claiming he is alive . . . that his tomb is empty . . . that they had seen him.  I followed Peter to the tomb and we found it indeed empty.  How can all this be?  How is it that he is now alive?  What does it mean?  And where is he?”

“Oh, foolish men who are slow of heart to believe in all that the prophets have spoken!  Was it not necessary for Yeshua to suffer these things and enter into his glory?”  Then beginning with Moshe (מׄשֶׁה) and all the prophets, the traveler explained to them all things found in the scriptures.

By the time they reached Emmaus, it was nightfall and they pleaded with the traveler to stay with them.

Women and children helped prepare the evening meal, lit candles, and set wine on the table before their guests.  There was something different in the air—an unusual warmth, a welcomed peace that neither Cleopas or Meydad understood.  They enjoyed

the traveler and admired his knowledge of the scriptures.  In fact, Cleopas hadn’t heard such teachings since . . .

Cleopas furrowed his brow as memories of the Messiah flowed through him like warm honey.  “. . . have you not read what God said to you, ‘I am the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob’? He is not the God of the dead but of the living.”  Cleopas also remembered, “The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy. I have come that they may have life, and have it in all its fullness.”

He almost fell to his knees when he recalled how Yeshua sat on the mountain, saying:  “Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.  Blessed are those who mourn, for they will be comforted. Blessed are the meek, for they will inherit the earth . . . .”

The disciple wiped away tears and forced himself to leave the memories behind him and join the others at the table.  When everyone was poised and ready to eat, the traveler gave thanks and broke bread, passing a portion to each of them.

At once, fear and elation rushed through Cleopas, then Meydad, for they recognized the traveler as Yeshua!

“Yeshua . . . Ha’Adon!” Cleopas and Meydad shouted.

Then Yeshua disappeared.

Cleopas and Meydad stared at one another, in awe of what they had seen.  Their hearts pumped with joy.  They were so excited that they tried to talk at the same time, but it was Cleopas who was the most outspoken.

“Did our hearts not burn within us while he talked on the road and opened the scriptures to us?” Cleopas asked.  “Hurry!  Hurry!!  We must go to Jerusalem and tell the others.”

When Cleopas and Meydad returned to Jerusalem, they pounded the locked doors of the house where the apostles were gathered.  John (the one whom Yeshua loved) opened the door and Cleopas rushed pass him and declared, “It is true!  The Lord has risen and he appeared to Simon just as he said.  And now he has appeared to us!”  Cleopas grabbed Nathaniel by the arms and shook him.  “It is true, Nathaniel.  Thomas, James, Philip, do you hear us.  It is true!  We have seen him!  We have seen the Lord!  We have seen Ha’Adon!  He is alive.  I tell you, he is alive!”

 


1 Comment

  1. Carolyn hankins says:

    Donna, you are so talented. This is beautiful. Keep writing!

    Like

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